The good news/bad news cover in question.

The good news/bad news cover in question.

The late entertainer George M. Cohan is quoted as saying, "It doesn't matter what you say about me as long as you spell my name right." His point was that as long as the newspapers caused the public to know his name, he could live with any editorial negatives.

But what happens when it's the other way around, i.e., the (virtual) ink is positive but they spell your name wrong? Perhaps I just find out.

We all write articles intended to earn the attention of our target market segment, and to establish what has become known as "thought leadership." The most recent online issue of San Diego Attorney magazine published my article All Referral Sources Are Not Created Equal. It’s about how lawyers can convert unproductive referral sources into fewer productive ones. I trust you'll find it helpful.

For me, the good news is that they published it, and listed it on the cover. (No, that good-lookin' guy isn't me.) The less good news is that, on the cover, the Table of Contents, and the article itself, they misspelled my surname as O'Horro.

Out of curiosity, I Googled "Mike O'Horro" (fervently hoping there were no ax-murderers among my ersatz namesakes). Happily, the few Mike O'Horros listed are probably more respectable than I am. The better news is that Google seems to have solved the problem for me. A search for Mike O'Horro produces (drum roll) the same results as if you'd searched for Mike O'Horo. Maybe the takeaway is to publish often so that search engines will interpret misspellings as an intent to search for the correctly-spelled entity. Or, it was simply my lucky day.

Kidding aside, for those who publish relevantly and consistently, over a long period of time you become a relative fixture in the search engines, and you might just be able to overcome a human error that would otherwise have erased your effort.

Mike O'Horo (with only one "r")

You know you have to improve your business development skills to get the business you need. But most of the training you see offered feels more like a degree program with a someday/maybe payoff rather than the specific help you need right now.

RainmakerVT is just-in-time training. You don’t have to commit to a long, drawn-out training program. That means that In 15-30-minute chunks, available from any computer or tablet 24/7, each course teaches you a concrete, practical skill you can apply right now, to the immediate challenge in front of you. Buy only what you need, only when you need it.

RainmakerVT is the most innovative, effective, convenient and affordable business development training you can get. Take a look at our course list, and then read what lawyers like you said about RainmakerVT in user-feedback interviews.