Viewing entries tagged
Demand-Trigger

Business Development: Step 1 is always “Google it”

Lawyers know they have to stay in contact, or risk missing out on work that a client or prospect is willing to award them, but doesn’t simply because too long a gap between communications has made them forget you. Too many lawyers struggle to generate relevant, welcomed conversation with clients and prospects. Here’s a better way.

The only 3 things lawyers need to develop business: Who, What, Why

Despite law firm management’s vociferous declarations that those with no business are in peril, out in the capillaries lawyers behave as if they still believe that billable tasks obviate what should be a survival-driven focus on finding a way to make some type of contribution to revenue generation. Here’s how to get your biz dev effort to the hygiene level.

Nail that meeting with your prospective client

A prospective client has identified three lawyers whom she believes possess the expertise and standing to solve her problem. The good news is that you’re one of them, and 10 minutes from now she’ll be sitting in your office to interview you.

The less-good news? You don’t know much about her beyond whatever dry information a Google search and her LinkedIn profile revealed. Here’s how to raise the odds in your favor.

The future of law firm business development belongs to the bold

Ultimately, the meek may inherit the earth. But history suggests that, in the meantime, meek salespeople will waste time, money and energy and miss out on the opportunities awaiting those with the vision and courage to take bold action. Legal service selling isn’t changing; it’s being born. Any similarities between what was and what will be is coincidental. Get ready for the future.

The "elevator speech"

Forget having an "elevator speech." Nobody wants to hear it. Instead, you need a Door-Opener, which explains the problem you solve for your clients. Here's why.

Cross-selling & referral trigger

Referral sources must see you as relevant to those they'd refer. Define yourself in terms of the business situations or problems that trigger demand.