Viewing entries tagged
Positioning

Why you haven’t been hired

Not getting hired? It’s not for the old-school reasons most lawyers (and others) assume, but for much simpler human reasons that are easier to fix.

Why triggering demand for your expertise makes all the difference

Too many lawyers attempt to get on prospects’ calendars to discuss some legal service or another. Without realizing it, they’re asking someone to allocate a portion of a busy day to discuss what, absent any correlation to a business challenge, is irrelevant to that day. This is why it’s hard to get appointments, and why they’re so often rescheduled or cancelled. Here’s a better way.

“Holiday Marketing” vs. Strategic December Business Development

About this time each year, law industry publications are rife with advice about “holiday marketing.” The advice tends to be about gift-giving protocols and using social events to network and create relationships. Here’s a much better way to use the last few weeks of the year.

The only 3 things lawyers need to develop business: Who, What, Why

Despite law firm management’s vociferous declarations that those with no business are in peril, out in the capillaries lawyers behave as if they still believe that billable tasks obviate what should be a survival-driven focus on finding a way to make some type of contribution to revenue generation. Here’s how to get your biz dev effort to the hygiene level.

Make it easy for prospects to recognize that they need you

How do those who buy what you sell recognize that they need you, that you’re relevant to their world and might just know something that would help them and make some part of their professional life better? The easy part is identifying what won’t do that: Legal-service nouns. Here’s a better approach.

Silo Selling is Lawyer-Centric, not Client-Centric

Most lawyers are comfortable in a neatly labeled box known as a "Practice Group." Such labeling is typically the first step into the world of Silo Selling. This may provide some context and perhaps even comfort for you. However, most businesspersons think in terms of business challenges or opportunities. These perspectives are not lawyer-centric. Here's how to be more client-centric.

What’s around the bend and over the horizon?

We all aspire to have our practice fulfill our three critical needs:

  1. Interesting work
  2. Premium pricing
  3. Appreciated by clients

The key to getting this is to “own” a piece of the future.  So, what does the future look like for your clients?  What macro trends will have the greatest impact on them – and how?

Consulting vs. Contracting

In your law practice, are you more like a contractor or a consultant? Should you care? If you care about pricing power, differentiation, perceived value, and having a seat at the decision table, the answer is a resounding "yes."

Time to make yourself relevant

A Door-Opener initiates business conversation that revives your contact list with a new discussion topic, making you part of that person's future.